Resources


Learn about Equitas’ most recent thinking, practices, tools and tips in everything HRE.

Engaging Decision Makers NEW

In this activity, participants identify the actors that have an influence on the issue they are addressing through a community action project. The activity can be facilitated with young people and is used in many of Equitas’ programs, including Speaking Rights and Young Women, Young Leaders. To support the activity, we have included a list of tips for engaging decision-makers from the compendium Youth Participation in the Middle East and North Africa.

 Download the activity»»

A five-step process to designing an evaluation in human rights education

Evaluation is sometimes described as a total experience because ideally it is part of our human rights education (HRE) work from the very beginning to the very end. Included as part of all the phases of a project, evaluation should reflect the totality of everything that we do in a Human Rights Education project. As such, evaluation needs to be developed in line with each specific training session. Evaluation should be inspired by the HRE activity itself and enhance our capacity to achieve our goals.

There is no single format for effective evaluation. In fact, the art of evaluation is choosing a process that both gives you the information you need and is, at the same time, feasible for you and your group or organization to carry out. Equitas operates a model in designing and implementing an effective evaluation process for human rights training that encompasses five basic steps:

    • Step 1: Understand the change that is needed – Training needs assessment
    • Step 2: Describe the desired change – Define results and develop objectives
    • Step 3: Increase effectiveness – Conduct formative evaluation
    • Step 4: Determine the changes that have occurred in the short, medium and longer term – Conduct end-of-training summative evaluation and transfer and impact evaluations
    • Step 5: Determine how to best communicate results to different stakeholders in order to highlight the changes that have occurred – Prepare evaluation report

This Equitas Shares It is a five-part series that will explore each of the five steps of the process to designing an evaluation in human rights education.

 Download Step 1 - Understand the change that is needed – Training Needs Assessment »»

Download Step 2 – Describe the desired change – Define results and develop objectives »»

Download Step 3 – Increase effectiveness – Conduct formative evaluation » » 

Download Step 4: Determine the changes that have occurred in the short, medium and longer term – Conduct end-of-training summative evaluation and transfer and impact evaluations » »

Download Step 5: Communicate results – the evaluation report » »  

Equitas’ approach to HRE for social change

For Equitas, human rights education (HRE) is a process of transformation that begins with the individual and branches out to encompass the society at large. Ultimately, human rights education inspires people to take control of their own lives and the decisions that affect them. Our approach to HRE involves the dynamic interplay of the different paradigms described in the resource below. Taken together, they enable people to expand their views of themselves, of others, and of the world and to take action for social change in their societies that are consistent with human rights values and standards.

Download the infographic

If you have any questions, thoughts or feedback about this resource, we would love to hear from you! Email Heather de Lagran: hdelagran@equitas.org

 

Youth Participation in the Middle East and North Africa

Participation is a fundamental right recognized in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In the document below, read about the concept of youth participation in the context the Equitas Mosharka project (2012-2015) in the Middle East and North Africa. You will also find the lessons learned and the good practice stemming from the project. Finally, we can read an example of a good practice in action from the Mosharka project.

Download the section of the publication on lessons learned and good practices that presents Youth Participation in the Middle East and North Africa. »

Download this section in Arabic. »

Guidelines for working with children and youth

Equitas is committed to protecting children’s rights regardless of sex, social status, language, religion, political beliefs, civil status, disability, sexual orientation, ethnic or nation origin. As such, we would like to share our Guidelines for working with children and youth. The purpose of the Guidelines is to provide Equitas staff, board, volunteers and interns, as well as partners, with clear guidance on what we expect of each other in terms of behaviour, as well as providing examples of acceptable and unacceptable conduct when interacting with children in our work.

 Equitas’ work with children is underpinned by the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), which states:

Children should be protected from all forms of physical and mental violence, injury, abuse, neglect, maltreatment and exploitation, including sexual abuse (Article 19).

Children have the right to participate and be heard in matters that concern them (Article 12).

 The Guidelines were developed with contributions from Equitas staff, partners and board members and in consultation with Tara Collins, assistant Professor at the School of Child and Youth Care at Ryerson University.

Download the Guidelines for working with children and youth

Picture it! Metaphors

In this activity, participants create visual metaphors in order to share a personal change they have experienced or something they are proud of having achieved. A visual metaphor is a representation of a person, place, thing, idea or experience by way of an image that suggests a particular association.Visual metaphors encourage critical reflection and can generate insight into an experience, change or achievement. They help participants explore and capture the many dimensions of change.

Download the activity sheet.

Gathering information from children and youth

The challenge of gathering information from children and youth themselves about their participation in decision making led to the development of an effective process that enabled us to do just that! The tool we are sharing consists of a series of activities used to gather information, from children themselves, about their participation in their community. The data collected through this tool can be used as baseline about children’s participation (from the perspective of boys and girls) as well as a starting point for their participation in the community.

Download the Gauging children’s participation through participation activity

Download the Community Mapping Template

How to engage young women in decision making

There are many factors that influence young women’s participation, but the three in particular we feel should be taken into consideration are motivation, capacity and opportunity. The experience of our Young Women Young Leaders program enabled us to develop this tip sheet.

Download the tip sheet

How to encourage youth to participate in decision-making

This article on children and youth participation in decision-making is based upon different experiences in our programming and also draws from an online conversation with human rights educators who had many great ideas on engaging youth in decision making.

 How to get youth to participate in decision making

Manuals

Equitas produces specialized manuals for each of its training sessions and workshops as well as tools and practices. The manuals provided on our website address a range of themes that Equitas covers in its current human rights education activities.

These publications may be reproduced by any organization for use in human rights education activities, provided the source is acknowledged and Equitas – International Center for Human Rights Education is notified of such use.

No part of these publications may be adapted, distributed in any other form or by any means, or stored in a database or retrieval system without the authorization of Equitas. Commercial reproduction and use are prohibited.

All content is the intellectual property of Equitas unless otherwise noted herein.

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